SLC Young Ambassador Blog: Week 4

26 07 2013

Hello, my name is Alana Zamora from San Marcos, Texas. This year, I was selected as a 2013 Smithsonian Latino Center Young Ambassador; Up to twenty-four graduating high school seniors are selected each year and are given the amazing opportunity to intern in a museum/cultural institution in their local community for four weeks. Currently, I am interning here at the Austin Children’s Museum. This week is the last week of my internship, and in this blog post, I describe my experience here at the ACM, as well as, insights into the different summer camps that we offer here at the Museum.

This week’s full day camp at the Austin Children’s Museum for ages 7-10 was titled ‘Get a Clue’, and the half day camp for ages 4-6 was ‘Passport Adventures’. Each day, I photographed the camp’s field trips and activities, and filtered, edited and uploaded the photos that I took onto the Museum’s Flickr account.

On Monday, July 22nd, we walked a few blocks with the full day campers to The Driskill hotel. There, we were given a tour and were told of it’s history; We learned that for well over a century, historical benchmarks have been crafted at The Driskill, such as, when Former President Lyndon B. Johnson awaited news of his successful 1948 Senate run and his 1960 election to the office of Vice President, and 1964 election as President. We also learned of the ghosts that have reportedly been seen at the hotel! Colonel Driskill himself is said to wander through the original side of the hotel and the spirit of Samantha Houston, a senator’s young daughter who was chasing a ball when she fell to her death on the grand staircase, has been seen bouncing a ball along the corridors in the hotel.Image

On Tuesday, July 23rd, the full day campers took a tour of the Texas State Cemetary. The Cemetary is the burial place for soldiers and founders of the Republic and State of Texas, elected state officials, jurists and other prominent men and women. Culturally, the Cemetary is unique because it represents every aspect of Texas history from European Colonization to modern day Texas politics. The Texas State Cemetary is the burial site of Stephen F. Austin, Ed Burleson, Bob Bullock and many more historical and cultural icons.Image

On Wednesday, July 24th, I photographed the half day camp, ‘Passport Adventures’. The continents of topic that day were Asia and Australia. The children participated in various activities, learning about kangaroos, origami, bamboo, and the Sydney Opera House. One specific activity of the day that I thought was pretty neat was where the children could create their own Moai statues out of clay, and decorate it with beads and feathers.Image

On Thursday, July 25th, I had my community outreach portion of my internship; Each Young Ambassador must hold a children’s story-time at a local library in their area. I traveled to the Little Walnut Creek Branch Library here in Austin to read Abuela’s Weave by Omar S. Castaneda. Abuela’s Weave is the story of Esperanza, a young Guatemalan girl, and her grandmother who grow closer as they weave some special creations and then make a trip to the market in hopes of selling them. This story shows the importance of family pride and personal endurance, and introduces children to the culture of Guatemala through the eyes of little Esperanza.Image

In the latter half of the day, I traveled back to the Austin Children’s Museum to be the photographer for the Museum Career Ladder & Volunteer Appreciation party. MCL participants and volunteers brought their friends and families to show them what they do at the museum and to have some fun! MCL is a volunteer and employment readiness program that offers opportunities to Austin area teens (12-17 year olds) to engage in fun and meaningful work at the Austin Children’s Museum. This year, there were over 1,100 active volunteers at the Museum. The youngest volunteer is four and the oldest is sixty-six.Image

On Friday, July 26th, the full day campers took a trip to the Visual Arts Center at the University of Texas at Austin. There, they toured the ceramics and painting studios, and learned about kilns and easels. They also visited visited the art galleries in the building.Image

Sadly, this is my last week at the Austin Children’s Museum. This four-week internship has truly been a great experience! Never having a job before, I was skeptical that I would not successfully fulfill what was expected of me…but at the conclusion of this month, I feel that I have done everything I’ve been asked to to my fullest potential. Throughout my internship, I have learned various skills, such as, time management, patience and team work. In a museum, there’s so much team work that goes into running a successful learning institution and I really do appreciate what every employee/volunteer at any museum does. Along with the Museum, I do believe that the most important skill we can give children is the ability to learn, and that the diversity and interactions among people from different backrounds enrich and strengthen our community. I am eternally grateful to have been selected as a Smithsonian Latino Center 2013 Young Ambassador, to have met many amazing individuals along the way, and to have been blessed with this amazing opportunity to work with the Austin Children’s Museum.Image

If you haven’t had the chance, check out my blog posts from the previous weeks of my internship!

1. http://blog.austinkids.org/2013/07/22/slc-young-ambassador-blog-week-1/

2. http://blog.austinkids.org/2013/07/22/slc-young-ambassador-blog-week-2/

3. http://blog.austinkids.org/2013/07/22/slc-young-ambassador-blog-week-3/





How to make your own glow-in-the-dark deep sea fish

24 07 2013

Background information: Ocean creatures that live in the deep ocean where there is no light often carry a light source of their own. Sometimes, they have special cells that can make light the way fireflies do. Just as often, the light comes from bacteria that live in and on the sea creatures. For example, the flashlight fish has light spots beneath its eyes. These spots are home to millions of luminescent bacteria. The bacteria get nourishment from the fish and the fish gets to have light. Light is important for catching food. Also, light can aid in confusing larger predators.

For this art project, you will need:

-Black paper

-Scissors

-Glow in the Dark paint

-Hole puncher

-String

Directions:

  1. Cut out a shape of a fish from the black piece of paperImage
  2. Decorate the fish with the glow-in-the-dark paintIMG_0436
  3. Wait for the paint to dry
  4. Hole punch a hole on the top of the fish & tie a string in itImage
  5. Hold your fish up to the light to charge it upImage
  6. Hang your fish, turn the lights off and watch it swim & flow!Image




SLC Young Ambassador Blog: Week 2

22 07 2013

Hello, my name is Alana Zamora from San Marcos, Texas. This year, I was selected as a 2013 Smithsonian Latino Center Young Ambassador; Up to twenty-four graduating high school seniors are selected each year and are given the amazing opportunity to intern in a museum/cultural institution in their local community for four weeks. Currently, I am interning here at the Austin Children’s Museum. I will be posting weekly blog posts to describe my journey here at ACM, as well as, insights into the different summer camps that we offer at the Museum.

This week, I helped lead the ‘Young Scientists’ half day summer camp program for children, ages 4-6. For every half day camp, we have story time, hands-on activities and free play in the Museum. I assisted in leading science and art activities, playing with the children in the Museum and supervising them throughout their time at the camp. At this week’s camp, I had the opportunity to prepare the activities for each day, so I was able to see how much work goes into organizing a camp. Also, I was able to give feedback in ways to improve the activities for next ‘Young Scientists’ camp.

On Monday, July 8th, the theme for the day was measurement. The children learned about time, weight, temperature and length. Some of the activities for that day were, measuring and weighing sand, taking the temperature of warm and cold water, and creating a clock. Another activity that we had the children do was draw a picture of what they think a scientist looks like.

Image

On Tuesday, July 9th, we learned about chemistry, reaction and slime. Camp leaders demonstrated baking soda experiments and helped the children create slime. The slime activity was very messy, but so much fun!Image

     On Wednesday, July 10th, the theme was color and magnification. Some activities that we had were, color mixing with paint, making a solar bead bracelet and Play-dough mixing. One of my favorite activities of the day was creating our own ‘rainbow’ using a flashlight and glass prism.Image

     On Thursday, July 11th, we learned about architecture and electricity. We had the children build houses out of wooden blocks and we had them create their own circuits.

     On Friday, July 12th, we learned about flying. The children learned about bats and made their own ‘bat hats’. They also created their own kite and roto-copter.

     Again, this week was amazing! I enjoy working with the children and watching them learn. Also, my fellow interns and volunteers are truly great individuals! I am amazed with all the learning that takes place during camp and I really do wish that I had the same opportunity at a younger age that all of these children are having now. Learning is fun!

     If you haven’t had the chance, check out my blog post from the first week of my internship!





Harness the Heat: Make Your Own Solar Oven!

16 08 2012

How do solar ovens work? Well, as you can tell from your day-to-day observations, the sun not only provides light, but also works as a heat source.  That’s why it’s warmer during the day, when the sun is out, than it is at night, when the moon is up.  With a solar oven, you use reflectors (aluminum foil) to reflect the sun’s light into a closed container and the heat is trapped inside.  With this heat, you can cook some really great snacks!

If you do make a solar oven, remember that the oven can get very hot (just like ovens in kitchens), so you should be very careful when using the oven. Heat-resistant cloths or hand covers are great ways to protect yourself from the heat.

To make your own solar oven, you will need the following materials:

– a pizza box

– aluminum foil

– plastic wrap

– tape

– pen or pencil

– scissors

– ruler

First take your pizza box and draw a square around the lid of the pizza box about two inches from the edges.  Cut along only three edges: the front and sides of the pizza box.  Do not cut the fourth side that runs along the back of the pizza box.

 

Fold along the uncut line so that you form a flap.  After folding the flap back, wrap it in a piece of aluminum foil and tape it down.  Make sure that the shiny side is facing out and that there are no wrinkles in the foil.

 

Next, open up the pizza box and cover the insides with foil.  Make sure to cover the bottom and the sides of the pizza box.  Have the shiny side of the foil face up and overlap the pieces to cover any gaps. Tape into place.

 

While the pizza box is open, we’re going to cover the hole made by the foil-covered flap with plastic wrap.  Before cutting a piece of plastic wrap, you can tape down one side and then unroll the plastic wrap across the hole.  Make sure the plastic wrap is the right size and that it is taped down tightly so that no air can get out.

After these steps, you’ve completed your solar oven!

 

Click for more to see how to make some yummy food with your new solar oven!

Read the rest of this entry »





Story Time Library: Let’s Get Organized!

13 08 2012

Hi ACM Blog readers!

I’m Melody,  a summer intern here at the museum, helping out with our archival projects, as well as with the Story Time library.

Each day before Story Time, our readers choose a few great stories from a whole collection of books here at the museum.  Sometimes, the books can get a little messy and hard to find.

Photo by Prio on Flickr

That’s why this summer, I have been finding new ways to organize them and clean the shelves up a bit!

In the Story Time Library, I have been using some fun, new colorful labels to help people find books that fall under certain topics.  Each color stands for a different topic: Green = Environment, Blue = Ocean, Orange = Mammals, Red = Food, etc.  If one day, a Story Time reader wants books about dogs, cats, and pizza, he or she can just look through the books labeled with an orange and/or red sticker!  Easy, right?

There are lots of great ways to group together similar things, not just for your books.

Activity: Organizing Time!

Try going through your bedroom or playroom to organize things like:

  • Clothes
  • Toys
  • School/art supplies
  • DVDs
  • Video games

Find a creative and fun way to group them together, so that they will be easier for you to find later on!  Maybe you can organize your movies and games alphabetically and your clothes by color and style. You could label different tubs or boxes with the words “Pens”, “Pencils”, “Markers”, and “Crayons”, so that your school and art supplies will stay where they are supposed to.

Any way you do it, make sure it helps you stay clean and organized!

Photo by jenni waterloo on Flickr
Group things by color!

Photo by matthew_moss on Flickr
Organize office supplies!





Be a Secret Scientist: Make Edible, Invisible Ink!

3 08 2012

Have you ever wanted to send a secret message to someone? Have you heard about invisible ink?  Invisible ink is ink that cannot be seen until revealed with a secret trick.  If you want to make your own, edible, and invisible ink, follow the directions below!

To make your invisible ink message, you will need the following:

– a few small containers

– at least one of the following:
lemon, orange or grapefruit juice
milk
sugar solution*
baking soda solution*
*(You can make the sugar and baking soda solution by mixing sugar or baking soda with a little bit of water until the water is saturated with the sugar or baking soda.)

– cotton swabs

– a piece of paper

– a heat source, such as a hair dryer, an electric iron, or an oven (set to a low heat, around 250 degrees, and check your message every few minutes!)

– a plastic tray

First, place your piece of white paper on the plastic tray.  Then, dip a cotton swab into one of your invisible inks, write your secret message on your piece of paper, and wait for the message to dry.  I used lemon juice, a sugar solution, and a baking soda solution for my invisible inks.

My wet inks!

Once the message has dried, put it under your heat source (a hair dryer or iron) and watch your message reveal itself!

After being heated, my messages were revealed!

What is the science behind your invisible ink message?

Well, what do all of the inks have in common? Lemon juice, orange juice, grapefruit juice, milk, sugar, and baking soda are all edible (they are all things that you can eat).  Now,  think about when you bake cookies for too long.  They turn brown or black.  Thus, when we  “bake” our edible inks, they become brown or black also!

My lemon juice became a light yellow and my baking soda solution turned a light brown.  My sugar solution didn’t show up very well, and I think it’s because I didn’t mix enough sugar into the water.  If you use the baking soda or sugar solution, make sure you use enough baking soda or sugar!

Which “ink” did you use? Did you try multiple inks? Which did you prefer?





Create your own Motion Ocean!

25 07 2012

In the next couple of weeks our Museum we will be having our Under the Sea and Extreme Planet camps where we will be exploring crazy weather phenomenas and learning about the ocean as well as the many plants and animals that call the ocean home! Here’s a simple experiment to help you start thinking about the many wonders of the ocean

You will need:

  • A  clear container with a lid (can be plastic or glass)
  • Blue food coloring
  • Some glitter (optional)
  • Baby oil or cooking oil
  • Small plastic floating toys

To make your own motion ocean just follow these simple steps!

    1. First, fill half of your container with water
    2. Then add a few drops of food coloring into the water and add some glitter too if you want!
    3. Pour in the baby oil/cooking oil until the container is about 3/4 full
    4. Add your favorite floating plastic toys on top of the oil
    5. Put the lid on the container
    6. Shake up your very own motion ocean!

Since water is denser or heavier than the oil it stays at the bottom while the oil stays at the top of the container. Since the two liquids never mix the water pushes the oil around at the surface making it look similar to waves in the ocean. Try creating your own motion ocean and let us know how yours turned out!